Snow shoveling time lapse

About 11 inches of snow at our house in Roanoke, Virginia for our second big snowstorm in 2010. My time lapse didn’t quite work out when I shoveled the first time Friday night, so this is from the second go-around of shoveling Saturday.

Three things I learned:

- Should’ve made the interval between shots less – maybe more like 10 seconds. I had it at 25 seconds.

- Might have been a good idea to shovel towards the camera, rather than away from it, just so my back isn’t to the camera all the time. My usual habit is to shovel towards the lawn, though.

- Could’ve adjusted the ISO and aperture so there was less shadow on me.

More snow photos at http://photos.jordanfifer.net

Song is “Snow (Hey Oh)” by Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Some links I’m looking at: 10-29-09

The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press // Arizona Supreme Court rules electronic data is public

  • “The Arizona Supreme Court today ruled that metadata – information about the history, tracking and management of an electronic document – is subject to the state’s public records law.”

Knoxville News Sentinel // FBI widens death-threats probe, subpoenas KNS online records

  • “The News Sentinel was served Monday with a federal grand jury subpoena for information related to a comment posted in September on its Web site, knoxnews.com. On the advice of corporate counsel, the newspaper turned over the information late Monday to FBI Special Agent Gregg Harmon.”

Another follow-up: news organizations report some false news

A follow-up to my previous post, CNN should be more cautious in breaking “news”:

The Associated Press has this story about how news outlets are increasingly rushing to report the news without verifying the facts first.

Aside from the “balloon boy” and Coast Guard non-shooting incidents which I mentioned in that previous post, the article also cites an example I wasn’t aware of:

A few days later in Washington, an official-looking press release from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce announced that the organization had reversed its position on climate change legislation.
Not so. It was an elaborate scam put on by members of the liberal activist group Yes Men, who were looking to draw attention to a policy stance with which it disagreed. Reuters moved a story based on the false press release, and both CNBC and Fox Business Network reported it — with the anchors correcting themselves mid-story upon learning it was false.

A few days later in Washington, an official-looking press release from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce announced that the organization had reversed its position on climate change legislation.

Not so. It was an elaborate scam put on by members of the liberal activist group Yes Men, who were looking to draw attention to a policy stance with which it disagreed. Reuters moved a story based on the false press release, and both CNBC and Fox Business Network reported it — with the anchors correcting themselves mid-story upon learning it was false.

News organizations cannot forget what their purpose is: to report the truth. They do everyone a disservice by rushing to report stories that have not been properly vetted.