Another follow-up: news organizations report some false news

A follow-up to my previous post, CNN should be more cautious in breaking “news”:

The Associated Press has this story about how news outlets are increasingly rushing to report the news without verifying the facts first.

Aside from the “balloon boy” and Coast Guard non-shooting incidents which I mentioned in that previous post, the article also cites an example I wasn’t aware of:

A few days later in Washington, an official-looking press release from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce announced that the organization had reversed its position on climate change legislation.
Not so. It was an elaborate scam put on by members of the liberal activist group Yes Men, who were looking to draw attention to a policy stance with which it disagreed. Reuters moved a story based on the false press release, and both CNBC and Fox Business Network reported it — with the anchors correcting themselves mid-story upon learning it was false.

A few days later in Washington, an official-looking press release from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce announced that the organization had reversed its position on climate change legislation.

Not so. It was an elaborate scam put on by members of the liberal activist group Yes Men, who were looking to draw attention to a policy stance with which it disagreed. Reuters moved a story based on the false press release, and both CNBC and Fox Business Network reported it — with the anchors correcting themselves mid-story upon learning it was false.

News organizations cannot forget what their purpose is: to report the truth. They do everyone a disservice by rushing to report stories that have not been properly vetted.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>